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Basic Information About Divorce

A divorce is an official court proceeding that terminates the marital union. Divorce can be initiated by either party if there are irreconcilable differences between them. If both parties agree to end the marriage, then it can be done through mutual consent. If the couple cannot come to an agreement, then the court can grant a divorce.

There are several reasons why someone might file for a divorce. Some couples simply need time apart to reconcile and get back together again. Others may not like living together anymore and want to start fresh. Still, others may have found out that they are incompatible and should not continue to live together. Whatever the reason for filing for divorce, the first step is to determine whether or not you can go forward with the divorce. If you cannot go forward with the divorce, then you can always talk to your lawyer about other options.

No-fault divorce laws allowed either spouse to file for divorce without having to prove the other had committed adultery or any other reason for breaking up the marriage. Unilateral divorce became possible because of these laws. Legal separations were similar to divorces except that the two spouses remained legally married even though they weren’t living together. Both spouses continued to share property and custody of the children. At the end of the legal separation period, the two spouses were legally separated.

Divorce is an unfortunate reality that many couples face when they marry. When divorcing, there are certain steps that need to be taken. First, the couple needs to determine what type of divorce they want. If they wish to stay together, then they should consider whether they want a legal separation or a divorce. If they choose a legal separation, then they may continue living together, but not get married again. A legal separation does not end the relationship but allows the couple to live separately until they decide to remarry. If the couple wants a divorce, then they need to file for divorce. After filing, the couple will receive a summons telling them to appear before a judge. At that time, the couple will answer any questions the judge asks about why they want a divorce. Then, the judge will ask the couple if they want to go through mediation or trial. If the couple chooses mediation, then they will meet with a mediator who will help them resolve their problems. If the couple decides to go to trial, then they will answer any questions the other side has about why they want a judgment of divorce. Then, the couple will have to prove that they were legally separated at the time of the divorce. Once this is done, the judge will issue a final judgment of divorce.

Marital property is any property acquired during the marriage. Any property that was acquired prior to the marriage is not considered marital property. If you own something before your marriage, then it is yours to keep. However, if you get married, any money or property you earn after that date becomes marital property. Marital property includes any property owned jointly by the spouses, including real estate, cars, boats, jewelry, artwork, antiques, collectibles, cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, pension plans, 401(k)s, IRAs, annuities, life insurance policies, and anything else that could be considered an asset.

Alimony is a type of spousal support. It is usually ordered when a couple divorces and can be ordered for a definite time or indefinitely. There are many factors that go into determining what amount of alimony will be awarded. These factors include the length of the marriage, whether there were children together, whether either party earned money during the marriage, and whether either party has any special needs. If you feel like your ex might not pay enough alimony, talk to a lawyer about filing for divorce. You could also file for legal separation instead. In many states, individuals who are not lawyers cannot represent themselves in court. An individual needs to hire a lawyer in Harris County, Galveston County, Fort Bend County, Montgomery County, Brazoria County, Houston, Sugar Land, Missouri City, Stafford, Texas at Thornton Esquire Law Group, PLLC, to represent them. Contact us today at thorntonesquirelawgroup.com for a free consultation.

Alimony is a financial obligation given to a spouse who is economically disadvantaged due to the breakup of their marriage. Spouses may be considered “dependent” if they have a lower income or fewer assets than their former partner. Supportive spouses must provide financial assistance to their less fortunate dependents. The amount of alimony awarded depends on the circumstances of each case. There are no legal guidelines for determining what an appropriate amount of alimony might be. Judges will consider the needs of the parties, including marital property, child custody, and any debts owed by the parties. Alimony lasts until you die or your former spouse dies. It may end sooner if you marry again, move in with someone else, or become disabled. Alimony also ends if either party remarries or moves out of state. Cheating affects alimony. Alimony is awarded when there is a divorce, legal separation, annulment, or death of a spouse. The court decides what kind of alimony to award, how long it lasts, and how much money is owed. Some states allow judges to consider adultery when deciding on an alimony amount. However, if you cheat on your partner after separation, the courts may not consider your infidelity when making a decision about alimony. Alimony is not considered income when determining whether someone qualifies for public benefits.

A divorce is a legal procedure by which two people legally separate themselves. It usually involves determining what happens to assets and debts acquired during the marriage. The court will determine an appropriate amount of money to divide the couple's assets and debts. Alimony is a financial obligation that should be paid to an ex-spouse when there is a legal separation. Alimony is designed to help the payer provide for his/her former partner after a marriage ends. Alimony is also sometimes called spousal support or maintenance. Alimony payments may last for a fixed period of time or until the payee remarries. If you need alimony, your attorney will explain whether you qualify and if so, what amount you will receive. You may also need to file a petition to obtain alimony.

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